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Monday, September 16, 2019

"Donate Blood to Mosquitoes, They Need it To Feed Their Kids," says Animal-rights Activist


mosquito

Aymeric Caron, a French animal rights activist and television presenter, said during an interview with the The Independent that we should not kill mosquitoes because they only need our blood to feed their kids just like human does for their child.

He claimed that we, the people, should take it as a donation to help them live and not to harm them as they also have lives to lose.

“One can consider that a blood donation from time to time to an insect who is only trying to nourish her children is not a drama,” Mr Caron said in a video.

Mosquitoes sucked blood from a subject to obtain proteins that their eggs need to be developed, so they can grow.

However, this may seems embarrassing especially for anti-speciesist in their principle of equal consideration of interests as they realise that the mother risks her life only to suck blood to nourish her children.

"A female mosquito really has no choice but to risk her life for her babies," he said.

Speciesism is an influential "argument that argues that the extension of moral membership to all humanity, regardless of individual properties such as intelligence, while denying it to nonhumans, also regardless of individual properties, is internally inconsistent."

An anti-speciesist like Caron believes that animal lovers should allow insects to bite them, however, it could endangers someone's health and life as mosquitoes' bites can cause catching malaria and filariasis.

“In Africa, where there is malaria, he allowed himself to kill mosquitoes. In France, where they are inoffensive, he allowed himself to be bitten,” Mr Caron said.


However, the head of Animal Equality, Toni Vernelli opposed the claims of Caron and said that we should draw a line to things that could bring risks, take “parasites that carry malaria and kill millions of people a year” for instance.

“For most people, this is a step too far and a distraction. It’s unhelpful in trying to educate people about the suffering of animals in factory farms, and is unrelated to animal welfare campaigns,” she said.

“We’re much better off focusing on the tangible things people can do to reduce suffering, such as not eating meat, using animal products and wearing fur,” she added.

In the latest report of the World Health Organization (WHO) released on November 2018, "there were 219 million cases of malaria in 2017, up from 217 million cases in 2016."

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